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THE CAFFEINE CONTENT OF YOUR DAILY INDULGENCES

In The News
CAFFEINE CONTENT
Frozen Desserts
Yogurts
Chocolates and Candies
Soft Drinks
Caffeinated Waters
Iced Teas
Flavored Instant Coffee
Energy Drinks

Caffeine was first isolated from coffee in 1820 by German chemist Friedlieb Ferdinand Runge, called it "Kaffebase." In 1821,independently, it was isolated by French chemists Pierre Robiquet, Pierre Pelletier, and Joseph Caventou. However, myth, legend, and history are replete with stories dating coffee and caffeine use centuries earlier. Chinese legend narrates that around 3000 BCE Emperor Shennong was already tea-ing up on an accidental decoction of fallen leaves. The ninth century recorded the use of coffee beans in Ethiopia. Then there are the hyperactive and insomniac goats noted to graze on coffee shrubs. In the 17th century coffee houses started sprouting up in Britain and Western Europe. The West Africans started chewing on kola nuts, adding it to coffee berries and tea leaves as pick-me-uppers. And there's the cocoa bean, part of the caffeine landscape since antiquity, introduced to Europe by the Spaniards as xocolati, bringing the cacao tree to the West Indies and the Philippines. However, although caffeine comes from various sources, it is coffee that caffeinates most of us.

Long, long before Starbucks, coffee houses in antiquity were popular gathering holes providing, besides caffeinated highs, various other stimulants, music, entertainment, gambling, drugs, and opportunities for libidinous encounters.
The photo above, a coffeehouse in Palestine, ca 1900.

 

In The News
In the News: FDA Investigates "Monster Energy" Drink Safety
In the News: Coffee vs The Grim Reaper: Drink Up
In the News: Caffeine Intake and Decreased Risk of Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Skin
In the News: Can Coffee Intake Lower Mortality Risk?
In the News: Tea, Coffee Consumption and MRSA Nasal Carriage (Aug 2011)
In the News: Drunk and Wide Awake: Energy Drink Cocktails (June 2011)
In the News: Coffee Improves Markers of Inflammation and Oxidative Stress
In the News: High Coffee/Decaf/Tea Intake Linked to Lower Diabetes Risk
More Good News for Long-Term Coffee Drinkers
Study found no increased deaths and actual cardiac benefits for women
Decaf Coffee. . . Not
In the News: Coffee Boosts Stroke Risk, Study Finds
AS A POINT OF REFERENCE, AN AVERAGE CUP OF BREWED COFFEE CONTAINS 135 MG OF CAFFEINE; AN AVERAGE CUP OF TEA, 50 MG.

FROZEN DESSERTS 
SERVICE
SIZE
 
mg
CAFFEINE
Ben & Jerry's No Fat Coffee Fudge Frozen Yogurt
1 cup
85
Starbucks Coffee Ice Cream, assorted varieties
1 cup
40-60
Haagen-Dazs Coffee Ice Cream
1 cup
58
Haagen-Dazs Fat Free Coffee Frozen Yogurt
1 cup
40
Haagen-Dazs Low Fat Coffee Fudge Ice Cream
1 cup
30
Starbucks Frappuccino Bar
1 bar
15
Healthy Choice Cappuccino Chocolate Chunk
    Low-Fat Ice Cream
1 cup
8
Healthy Choice Cappuccino Mocha Fudge
     Low-Fat Ice Cream
1 cup
8

YOGURTS
SERVICE
SIZE
 
mg
CAFFEINE
Danon Coffee Yogurt
8 oz
45
Yoplait Cafe Au Lait Yogurt
6 oz
5
Dannon Light Cappuccino Yogurt
8 oz
Less than 1
Stonyfield Farm Cappuccino Yogurt
8 oz
0

CHOCOLATES & CANDIES
SERVICE
SIZE
 
mg
CAFFEINE
Hershey Special Dark Chocolate Bar
1.5 oz bar
31
Hershey Milk Chocolate Bar
1.5 oz bar
10
Coffee Nips hard candy
2 pieces
6
Hot chocolate
1 cup
5

SOFT DRINKS
SERVICE
SIZE
mg
CAFFEINE
Josta
12 oz
58
Mountain Dew
12 oz
55
Surge
12 oz
51
Diet Cola
12 oz
47
Coca-Cola 
12 oz
45
Dr Pepper, regular or diet
12 oz
41
Sunkist Orange Soda
12 oz
40
Pepsi-Cola
12 oz
37
Barqs Root Beer
12 oz
23
Barqs Diet Root Beer
12 oz
0
7-Up or Diet 7-up
12 oz
0
Minute Maid Orange Soda
12 oz
0
Mug Root Beer
12 oz
0
Sprite or Diet Sprite
12 oz
0

CAFFEINATED WATERS
SERVICE
SIZE
mg
CAFFEINE
Java Water
16.9 oz
125
Krank
16.9 oz
100
Aqua Blast
16.9 oz
90
Water Joe
16.9 oz
60-70
Aqua Java
16.9 oz
50-60

ICED TEAS
SERVICE
SIZE
mg
CAFFEINE
Celestial Seasonings Iced Lemon Ginseng Tea
16 oz
100
Snapple Iced Tea, all varieties
16 oz
48
Lipton Iced Tea, assorted varieties
16 oz
18-40
Nestea Pure Sweetened Iced Tea
16 oz
34
Nestea Pure Lemon Iced Tea
16 oz
22
Arizona Iced Tea, assorted varieties
16 oz
15-30
Celestial Seasonings Herbal Iced Tea
16 oz
0

FLAVORED INSTANT COFFEE
SERVICE
SIZE
mg
CAFFEINE
General Foods International Coffee, Orange Cappuccino
8 oz
102
General Foods International Coffee, Cafe Vienna
8 oz
90
Maxwell House Cappuccino, Mocha
8 oz
60-65
General Foods International Coffee, Swiss Mocha
8 oz
55
Maxwell House Cappuccino, French Vanilla or Irish Cream
8 oz
45-50
Maxwell House Cappuccino, Amaretto
8 oz
25-30
General Foods International Coffee, Viennese Chocolate Cafe
8 oz
26
FIGURES FROM THE CENTER FOR SCIENCE IN THE PUBLIC INTEREST (CSPI): BASED ON MANUFACTURER'S INFORMATION / PUBLISHED: WASHINGTON POST, AUGUST 1997

ENERGY DRINKS
FLUID
OUNCES
mg
CAFFEINE
mg/fluid oz
Full Throttle Energy Drink
16
200
12.5
Monster Energy Drink
16
160
10.0
NOS Energy Drink
16
260
16.2
NOS Powershot
2
125
62.5
Red Bull
8.46
80
9.5
Redline Power Rush
2.5
350
140.0
Rockstar
16
160
10.0
Rockstar 2x Energy Drink
12
250
20.8
Rockstar Energy Shot
2.5
200
80.0
Spike Energy Double Shot
4.26
350
82.2
Xyience Xenergy
16
200
12.5

Natural Standard Safety Update: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is investigating claims of deaths attributed to the the energy drink, Monster Energy®. The caffeine content of energy drinks are not always clearly included in the label. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that teenagers consume 100 mg or less of caffeine. A 24 oz can of Monster Energy contains about 240 mg of caffeine, about seven times the caffeine in a 12 ounce can of soda.

AS A POINT OF REFERENCE, AN AVERAGE CUP OF BREWED COFFEE CONTAINS 135 MG OF CAFFEINE; AN AVERAGE CUP OF TEA, 50 MG.
For a comprehensive chart of caffeinated drinks on line, go to Energy Fiend.


In the News:
Drunk and Wide Awake: Energy Drink Cocktails
Sandra Fryhofer, MD
There is a new trend among college students and adults of mixing energy drinks with alcohol in order to drink more and drink longer. . . These highly caffeinated energy drinks can deliver as high as 500 mg of caffeine per serving; so-called "energy shots" as high as 100-350 mg of caffeine per oz. . . . The consequences can be dangerous and deadly . . . The use of high caffeine content drinks that might counteract sleepiness and drunkenness, but which does not prevent impairment cause by alcohol, including judgment, reaction time, and motor skills . . . a state the report calls "wide awake drunkenness." Medscape
COMPARATIVE TABLE
CAFFEINE CONTENT OF ENERGY DRINKS AND USUAL CAFFEINE DRINKS
DRINK
Serving Size
mg of Caffeine
Homemade coffee 6 oz 75 - 100 mg
Coffeehouse coffee 6 oz up to 150 mg
Caffeinated soda 12 oz 35 - 50 mg
Energy drink one serving 500 mg / serving
Energy shots 1 oz 100 -350 mg / oz
FDA limit for cola drinks is set at 0.02%, a max of 71 mg per 12-oz serving. At present, this limit does not apply to energy drinks.

In the News:
Heavy Coffee Consumption Linked With Increased Risk of All-Cause Death
Study reports drinking more than four cups of coffee per day dose more than increase jitters. Heavy coffee consumption, defined as more than 28 cups of coffee per week, is associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality among men. (Michael O'Riordan / Aug 15, 2013)
Medscape News/Internal Medicine
In the News: FDA Investigates Monster Energy® Drink Safety
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is investigating claims that several deaths have been caused by Monster Energy®, an energy drink manufactured by Monster Beverage Corporation. . . Natural Standard
In the News: Coffee Vs The Grim Reaper: Drink Up
Study showed that adjusted for other factors (white meat intake, red meat, total calories, smoking) the more coffee you drink, the lower the risk for all cause mortality (heart disease, stroke, respiratory disease, cancer, etc.) For cancer risk, zero impact. (Henry R. Black, MD / Medscape News / Internal Medicine)
In the News: Caffeine Intake and Decreased Risk of Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Skin
Study showed the amount of caffeine intake from all dietary sources was inversely associated with basal cell carcinoma risk. Decaffeinated coffee consumption was not associated with a similar decrease in BCC risk. Read Abstract (Cancer Res. 2012 Jul 1;72(13):3282-9.)
In the News: Can Coffee Intake Lower Mortality Risk?
For cause-specific mortality, researchers noted inverse associations for deaths resulting from heart disease, stroke, diabetes, respiratory disease, infections, injuries, and accidents. However, the same was not true of deaths from cancer. In contrast, there was no significant association between coffee consumption and deaths from cancer in women. There was a borderline positive association in men. The results provide reassurances with respect to the concern that coffee drinking might adversely affect health. N Engl J Med.2012;366:1891-1904. (From Medscape Education Clinical Briefs)
In the News: Tea and Coffee Consumption and MRSA Nasal Carriage
An estimated 2.5 million persons (1.4% of the population in the U.S.) are MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus) nasal carriers. Consumption of hot coffee or tea was found associated with a lower likelihood of MSRA nasal carriage and potential MESA infection. The odds of MRSA nasal carriage were lower for those drinking both beverages. The mechanisms await further studies and elucidation, for coffee it is attributed the potential antibacterial properties of trigonelline, glyoxal, methylglyoxal and diacetyl; and for tea, tannic acides and catechins. Additionally, both tend to decrease iron absorption, and iron is critical to Staph aureus growth. In addition, other studies have shown benefits with the use of green tea for debridement of MSRA-infected decubitus ulcers and nebulized green tea catechin extracts in decreasing MSRA in the sputum of elderly patients with cardiovascular disease.

There was not statistical significant relationship with iced tea or soft drink consumption. The failure of iced tea to show similar benefits has been conjectured to lower levels of polyphenolic compounds compared to hot tea. Other factors considered were the volatile antimicrobial compounds in the vapors reaching the nostrils when drinking hot coffee or tea and the possible benefits of higher nostril temperature to immune response. (Tea and Coffee Consumption and MRSA Nasal Carriage
Eric M. Matheson, MD, MS; Arch G. Mainous III, PhD; Charles J. Everett, PhD; Dana E. King, MD, MS / Annals of Family Medicine. 2011;9(4):299-304. © 2011 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc. / Medscape )
In the News: Drunk and Wide Awake: Energy Drink Cocktails (Sandra Fryhofer, MD)
There is a new trend among college students and adults of mixing energy drinks with alcohol in order to drink more and drink longer. This highly caffeinated energy drinks can deliver as high as 500 mg of caffeine per serving; so-called "energy shots" as high as 100-350 mg of caffeine per oz. The consequences can be dangerous and deadly . . . The trend involves the use of high caffeine content drinks that might counteract sleepiness and drunkenness, but which does not prevent impairment, reaction time and motor skills . . . a state of "wide awake drunkenness." Medscape
In the News:
Coffee Consumption Improves Markers of Inflammation and Oxidative Stress
Another study points to the beneficial effects of coffee consumption. Researches showed drinking coffee improved markers of subclinical inflammation and oxidative stress, as well as as increase in HDL cholesterol, the "good" cholesterol in the lipid profile. Although previous studies have shown possible protective benefits against T2DM, the study found no effects on glucose metabolism. (Heartwire CME / CME Author Laurie Barclay, MD)
In the News:
High Coffee/Decaf/Tea Intake Linked to Lower Diabetes Risk
Meta-analysis results showed high intakes of coffee, decaf coffee and tea are associated with a reduced risk for type 2 diabetes. Coffee consumption was reported to be inversely related with type 2 diabetes risk – every additional cup of coffee a day was associated with a 7% decrease in excess risk for diabetes. Although the study had limitations, the implications would be significant if the benefits are observed in interventional trials. (Laurie Barclay, MD / Medscape Medical News/ Dec 14, 2009)
Coffee and Type 2 Diabetes - Drink Up?

The results? Coffee lovers, rejoice. The highest coffee consumers had the lowest diabetes risk. Those who drank three or more cups of coffee per day had a 37% lower risk for diabetes as compared to those who limited their intake to one cup per day. . . Moderate coffee consumption -- that is, up to 6 eight-ounce cups per day -- may help prevent type 2 diabetes. So drink up and enjoy. (Sandra Fryhofer / Medscape Internal Medicine. Sept 10, 2014)
In the News:
Cup of coffee a day lowers risk of high BP
A Japanese study on 4,554 men, age range of 20-70, reports that drinking a cup of coffee or two a day lowers the risk of high blood pressure. Those who drank no coffee had a higher incidence of hypertension. The benefit was attributed to chlorogenic acid, a polyphenol found in coffee, considered to have an expanding effect on blood vessels. Another Japanese study reports a cup of coffee a day halves the risk of colon cancer among women. 

In the News:
No higher death risk in long-term coffee drinking
A study of long-term coffee drinking led by Esther Lopez-Garand at the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid in Spain followed 84,214 U.S. women from 1980 to 2004 and 41,736 U.S. men from 1986 to 2004. The result sent the coffee beans dancing: Regular coffee drinking – up to 6 cups daily – was no associated with increased deaths among the middle-aged participants. women drinking 2-3 cups of caffeinated coffee a day showed a 25% lower risk of death from heart disease. For men, the result was not statistically significant. There was also no association found with cancer.

Studies on coffee drinking have been for the most part favorable — great source of antioxidants, lower risk of ovarian cancer, lowering of blood pressure. However, for pregnant women, a study showed twice the miscarriage risk on two or more cups of coffee a day.

Yahoo Health
Will Dunham - Mon Jun 16, 2:13 PM PDT

In the News:
Coffee Boosts Stroke Risk, Study Finds
Another bit of news to add to the "coffee paradox." A cup of coffee can increase the risk for ischemic stroke, particularly among infrequent drinkers. A study found a 2-fold increase risk for stroke in the hour after drinking a cup of coffee. There was no increase in risk in the hour after a cup of caffeinated tea or cola. Although coffee contains other substances, "caffeine if the most likely candidate pulling the trigger." The study was published in Neurology.2010;75:1583-1588. (Medscape Internal Medicine / Nov 2010)

Decaf Coffee. . . Not!
Wonder why you're still getting that caffeine buzz even after going decaf on doctor's advice? That familiar racing of the pulse? That tremulous charge? A study of 10 decaf samples from different coffee establishments showed levels of caffeine in the range of 0-13.9 mg/16 oz serving.

Same outlet Starbucks decaf espresso and brewed coffee contained 2.0-16.8 mg/shot and 12.0-13.4 mg per 16 oz serving. respectively.

AS A POINT OF REFERENCE, AN AVERAGE CUP OF BREWED COFFEE CONTAINS 135 MG OF CAFFEINE; AN AVERAGE CUP OF TEA, 50 MGS.

Although the math might suggest it will take 10 cups or more of faux-decaf to get the equivalent caffeine in a cup of regular brew, there are patients specially sensitive to the effects of caffeine who gets buzzed and charged at much lesser caffeine concentrations.

Source: Caffeine Content of Decaffeinated Coffee: Journal of Analytical Toxicology, ISSN 0146-4760, Volume 30, Number 8, October 2006, pp.611-613



Last Update September 2014
IMAGE SOURCE: A coffee house in Palestine / 1900 Copyright by B. L. Singley / File:Kahvihuone.jpg / Public Domain / Wikipedia 
Additional Sources and Suggested Readings
(1)
Caffeine / Wikipedia
(2)
Caffeine Content of Decaffeinated Coffee: Journal of Analytical Toxicology, ISSN 0146-4760, Vol 30, No 8, October 2006, pp 611-613.
(3)
Caffeine Content of Drinks / Energy Fiend
(4)
FDA Investigates Monster Energy® Drink Safety / Oct 2012 / Natural Standard
      
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